When is a Workshop…Well Not a Workshop? Part 3

 

I would like to share work of all the artists I met, and I might over the next year. But there is one more for now—Katalin Ehling. I was particularly in awe of this artist whose work I saw daily as I entered the room. Katalin was using hand stitching on organza as her line and applying to her paintings which told incredible personal stories of home and place.

For about 40 years she worked in batik and has also done encaustic monoprints. The hand stitching she produced was so fine I thought she had used a machine, but this was a skill she learned from her mother. You can visit her website at: http://www.katalinehling.com/

When is a Workshop…Well Not a Workshop? Part 2 Surrealists

 

My mentoring week with Katherine Chang Liu also included “programs” that she developed for the group. For an hour each morning we viewed and discussed contemporary art. I found myself really enjoying the work of the surrealists, which was definitely not the case before. Perhaps what made me appreciate this art even more was the work another artist in the mentoring sessions—Judith Visker.

According to her bio, Judith had a career as a nurse before studying art. She painted in stylized representational style for a long time, but is now “more concerned with where the materials take me, with color relationships, formal design and surface quality.” She has exhibited in museum shows, galleries and exhibitions and has won awards. She is the Gallery Director at The Wham Art Center in Surprise, AZ where she has her studio, shows her work, and teaches classes. She graciously allowed me to share a few images. You can find more at her website: http://www.judithviskerart.com/

Enjoy.

 

When is a workshop…well not a workshop? Part

I just spent a week in Arizona working with Katherine Chang Liu, an internationally recognized artist and teacher. Katherine calls what she does mentoring, not a workshop, partly because she does not demonstrate techniques.

Katherine does not dwell on an artist’s deficiencies, instead she identifies each individual’s strengths and guides them by building upon these strengths to form their personal visual language. Her ability to discover the essence of each artist’s work was amazing. At least in my own personal case, it was positive reinforcement.

Although my work space was totally mine to organize and set up, I was fortunate enough to be near two incredible abstract artists, Nancy Dini, and Jackie Roliardi. Nancy was working with texture and Jackie with shapes. Observing the various artists and how they worked was an added benefit of the week. You can find Jackie’s work at https://jackieroliardiart.artspan.com/

Just Paint

Image
“Spilling Over”
copyright 2014 Patricia Steele Raible

It’s been a week since I returned from a 8-day intensive workshop in Taos, New Mexico, with four wonderful artists and teachers: Fran Larsen, Katherine Chang Liu, Skip Lawrence, and Topher Schink. I still feel a little like I am in a time warp. I’m sure part of it is the concentration on art every day without life interfering. This was a workshop I contemplated for two years before finally saying yes, and I’m very glad I did. That said, how do I carry forth that momentum—beyond a week, a month or a year?

They advised and I concur that you do it by having a plan and doing your very best to stay with it. Painting every day makes a big difference in my work and in my temperament. Yes, sometimes life intervenes. We can’t help sickness, death, or even the occasional family crisis, but you can paint through all of it. My plan is a simple one: getting up an hour earlier every day gives me one more hour to paint. No computer, no phone, just paint.