Where Am I Going?

MendingFencesinsert
“Mending Fences,” mixed media on board, 11″ x 20″
journal
Journal entry “Mending Fences”

 

Sometimes I just put paint on paper, moving it here or there, adding a bit of this or that. Sometimes it works out. Most of the time, not so much.

Of course, that’s not true for everyone. Plein air painters produce their best work onsite. And I’ve seen some other wonderful painters who seem to start with one element and just take those twists and turns in the road one at a time until bang—they are in New York or Los Angeles.

If I do that I’m in the middle of no where in Iowa (and yes, Iowa can be lovely), but it’s probably the middle of winter. And while it may be beautiful, it has no focus. I’m one of those artists who needs to have some idea of where they are going, just a bit of a road map. Otherwise, I wander off tract. I see that nice tree over there or perhaps a lovely lake and take a hike. I know that many artists do studies, and I’ve done a few. But the best method for me seems to be a middle ground.

I’ve found that working on ideas in my journal helps me solidify placement of elements, color, markings. With a few little things worked out, I can concentrate on the idea behind the painting and on the emotions and feelings. Hopefully, this produces better strokes, more complicated markings. Doing this also helps when I am in a period that I feel stuck. “I am working,” but because it is in a journal, “I am not exactly working.” Somehow this frees me.

This method has its drawbacks. I can’t be as spontaneous. And don’t think it doesn’t mean I won’t have to redo a painting—but it is a place to start and a way to keep on track.

So what’s your successful method?

 

Over and Over

Changing just one thing can make a difference.

Over and Over, 18" x 24", Mixed media on paper
“Over and Over,” 18″ x 24″, mixed media on paper

You know how a tune gets locked in your head, an “ear worm” they call it. I am particularly susceptible to any kind of “worm” whether a tune or a behavior. I seem to get locked into action or inaction.

I have been trying to discover how we free ourselves from repeating behavior that we know isn’t good for us, whether it is obsessing over a problem or just painting in the same way we always have. One suggestion was to change just one thing. In my yoga class the instructor often says something similar. She suggests moving the right arm out as you lift the left leg or putting the arms in front rather than behind in “child’s pose.”

I normally paint on deep wood cradles with a highly textured substrate. So I decided to paint on paper. It appears to me this one change has made me focus more on markings, which may well be a good thing.

Oh, I guess I did change two things. Instead of my classical or new age music, I listened to a bit of country. Go figure.

Perhaps you might try changing just one thing in your art or your life—or two?

No Destination

borderlandwandering
“Untitled,” 16″ x 20,” mixed media collage on deep panel

The week has just started and I am tired. To say it has been difficult to concentrate on art the last few weeks is well…an understatement. Illness, my own upper respiratory infection and my elderly mother’s increasing anxiety, has consumed me.

Finding myself the bad guy is not a new role, just one that comes and goes. And no matter how you feel at the moment, you really don’t want it to return. You want all hatchets buried, all peace pipes smoked. But usually, life doesn’t work that way even with the most optimistic outlooks. To keep my own head about me, I paint.

Lately, I have been working on paper, which doesn’t create my usual amount of texture. But it still allows quite a bit, just more visual than tactile. And because there is less preparation, I can work in the moment. Luckily, most of the layers also dry a bit more quickly as well.

This one, as yet untitled, is likely part of a new series. I feel myself moving a brush, a pencil over the paper as if it is a landscape I want to explore—even though there is no definite destination.

Do we need one? Can’t we just begin a journey and see what will happen, where we will go if we follow a line?

 

 

Covering Everything With White

seeinginadifferentlight3detail
“Seeing In A Different Light III,” (detail of 4-sided painting 36″ x 8″ square), mixed media on wood

As I painter I know that if there is an area I don’t like in an artwork, I can cover it with white and begin again, another chance if you will. Here in the South of the US, January seems to be symbolizing that chance—a bit of a “do over” if you will. But the interesting thing is that no matter how much we cover, what is underneath is still there. A snow-covered roof may look beautiful, but if it leaks; it leaks. There is only so much covering you can do.

In my artwork I have found that after a while the paint won’t stick very well, and you have to dig deep and sand carefully to get solid surface on which to build. Perhaps it’s time to take stock, to use this as an analogy for my life as well as my work.

It’s A Wrap

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rCoND8EooA

 My first video is complete, and I feel much like a five-year-old who has finally learned to tie his shoes—though not without tears.

Since I have no technology genes, it took almost two weeks, off and on. Yes, I still remember typewriters and have even used them. So while the video doesn’t have the detail I would like, I’m ( we’re) feeling rather proud. My partner in this venture was my partner in life.

May I also say thank you to those whose posted “how to’s” on You Tube.

Art is Prayer

openingweb
“Opening,” 10″ x 10″

 

To pray you open your whole self

To sky, to earth, to sun, to moon

To one whole voice that is you.

And know that there is more

That you can’t see, can’t hear,

Can’t know except in moments

Steadily growing and in languages

That aren’t always sound but other

Circles of motion.

 

Taken from the first few lines of “Eagle Poem” by Joy Harjo

A Whisper Can Be Powerful

I’ve learned that small and quiet can be powerful.

watertimpani3whisper
“Water Timpani III: Whisper,” 10″ x 10″, mixed media on deep wood panel, https://www.artfinder.com/product/water-timpani-iii-whisper/

It has been a couple of weeks since I hiked the short trail into High Falls at Dupont State Forest. You could hear the roar long before you had any view, a view that is spectacular. But the truly powerful moment for me was a tiny whisper.

When we got to the base of the falls, we sat and I looked at the rocks and water flowing just at my feet. The crowd of people around me disappeared. That soft, playful gurgle over rocks at your feet can be just as magical and engaging as a waterfall plunging 60 vertical feet.

Small and quiet can also be powerful—because powerful is about your heart and mind.