The Rewards of Sharing

"Dual Duty," 16" x 20," mixed media on deep wood panel
“Dual Duty,” 16″ x 20,” mixed media on deep wood panel

Sometimes I forget to share. I stay in the studio painting and don’t enter shows, teach classes, or volunteer to talk to groups. It becomes a bad habit.

Yesterday, because my husband promised, I gave a short artist’s talk to a group of seniors like myself. It was meant to inspire them to share their own life stories and changes in their lives, but I think it inspired me more.

I only talked and answered questions for about 30 minutes and took three of my recent paintings. The talk was mostly about my love of art, how it had been part of my life since my twenties, and more important in the last 10 as a full-time artist. But I also talked about process and how I painted these three pieces in particular.

As I was driving home one of things I noticed was that as I talked I got more excited about my work. Talking about my art seemed to stimulate me. It was as if talking about these paintings in a new series not only gave me more confidence but also clarified what I was doing and nudged me forward. I wanted to go directly to the studio.

I think sharing is important no matter what you do with your time. You would be surprised that so many people are interested. “Show and Tell” is not just for kindergartners.

 

Advertisements

Author: patricia906

I am a mixed media artist using surface design and texture to explore the patterns and associations in our world.

1 thought on “The Rewards of Sharing”

  1. I think sharing is important too. While I love to paint, writing about what I paint, sharing my thoughts about the process, the inspiration, gives me almost as much pleasure as its creation. And as always when writing, I learn something I didn’t know about what I was doing just by writing about it. I imagine that’s true when talking about your work as well. Names also intrigue me. “Dual Duty,” I wonder what inspired you to name it that? Looking at your painting, I see a wall, some vague obstacle and a little smiling glow peaking over the edge and surmounting it. I imagine others would see other things. So interesting, these abstracts.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s